Yeah, I don’t really have anything to say anymore.

(Reblogged from chromadepthblog)

wonderfulcaricature-of-intimacy:

My names Ashley and I wear too much eyeliner.

(Reblogged from wonderfulcaricature-of-intimacy)

I have a new favorite thing.

I cannot keep this up.

Too much introspection can really fuck you up.

(Source: nasa.gov)

(Reblogged from blackholewaltz)

As always, waking up ridiculously disappointed in myself.

mamadacryphiliac:

gamerzgalaxy:

Halo Graphics Evolution : Anniversary vs. Original

Apparently graphics have gotten slightly better over the last decade !

shanemc117

Welp, guess I’m getting the One.

(Reblogged from ddacryphiliacc)

I do not practice enough for the things I try to pull off. Progress though.

expose-the-light:

Earth from Space by Astronaut André Kuipers

(Source: space.com)

(Reblogged from alien-geometry)

infinity-imagined:

The Lena River Delta, imaged in infrared light by Landsat 7.

(Reblogged from alien-geometry)

ashthorp:

Here are some more explorations of shapes, patterns and sacred geometry.

(Reblogged from alien-geometry)
I have done a terrible thing, I have postulated a particle that cannot be detected.

Wolfgang Pauli [Statement of 1930, after postulating the existence of the very elusive neutrino; as quoted by Frederick Reines, in his “Foreword” to Spaceship Neutrino (1992) by Christine Sutton, p. xi]

(via blindmen6)
(Reblogged from blindmen6)
zero-one-infinity:

So I just started this book last night and I thought I’d share it with you guys. Especially great for those of you with overlapping interests in physics, mysticism, and psychology.
Synopsis:

The extraordinary story of psychoanalyst Carl Jung and physicist Wolfgang Pauli and their struggle to quantify the unconscious.
In 1932, the groundbreaking physicist Wolfgang Pauli met the famous psychoanalyst Carl Jung. Pauli was fascinated by the inner reaches of his own psyche and not afraid to dabble in the occult, while Jung looked to science for answers to the psychological questions that tormented him. Their rich friendship led them, in Jung’s words, into “the no-man’s land between physics and the psychology of the unconscious … the most fascinating yet the darkest hunting ground of our times.” Both were obsessed with the far-reaching significance of the number “137”—a primal number that seemed to hint at the origins of the universe itself. Their quest to solve its enigma led them on a lifelong journey into the ancient secrets of alchemy, the work of Johannes Kepler, and the Chinese Book of Changes. This is the captivating story of an extraordinary and fruitful collaboration between two of the greatest thinkers of the twentieth century.

zero-one-infinity:

So I just started this book last night and I thought I’d share it with you guys. Especially great for those of you with overlapping interests in physics, mysticism, and psychology.

Synopsis:

The extraordinary story of psychoanalyst Carl Jung and physicist Wolfgang Pauli and their struggle to quantify the unconscious.

In 1932, the groundbreaking physicist Wolfgang Pauli met the famous psychoanalyst Carl Jung. Pauli was fascinated by the inner reaches of his own psyche and not afraid to dabble in the occult, while Jung looked to science for answers to the psychological questions that tormented him. Their rich friendship led them, in Jung’s words, into “the no-man’s land between physics and the psychology of the unconscious … the most fascinating yet the darkest hunting ground of our times.” Both were obsessed with the far-reaching significance of the number “137”—a primal number that seemed to hint at the origins of the universe itself. Their quest to solve its enigma led them on a lifelong journey into the ancient secrets of alchemy, the work of Johannes Kepler, and the Chinese Book of Changes. This is the captivating story of an extraordinary and fruitful collaboration between two of the greatest thinkers of the twentieth century.

(Reblogged from zero-one-infinity)